Sunday, November 10, 2019

Lawfully Innocent


Benjamin Beckett, a handsome young English lord, lacks purpose in his life of privilege. After learning the truth about his heritage, he decides to leave unbearable boredom behind, making drastic changes in his too predictable life. Adventure awaits Benjamin across the ocean, and he embraces the challenges before him.

Can a man who's not yet thirty be strong enough to impact the New World?

Will he find a cure for his loneliness and ennui?

My thoughts: I thought that the premise of this story was interesting, since Benjamin is raised in England, in a very different world than the one he choses when he moves to America and becomes a Marshall. It was also interesting to have him move from a country that had abolished slavery to one that was still very much in the midst of it being acceptable.
The story is short, so it's easy to get through quickly. I liked the message of it as Benjamin does his job while putting his beliefs into practice. It has some beautiful scenes in it!
I received this book from Celebrate Lit. This is my honest review and is in no way influenced by receiving a complimentary copy.

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About the Author:
Robin Helm’s books reflect her love of music, as well as her fascination with the paranormal and science fiction.
Previously published works include The Guardian Trilogy: Guardian, SoulFire, and Legacy; the Yours by Design series: Accidentally Yours, Sincerely Yours, and Forever Yours; Understanding Elizabeth; and More to Love. Ms. Helm also contributed stories to A Very Austen Christmas and A Very Austen Valentine.
She plans to publish Maestro, Lawfully Innocent, and A Very Austen Romance: Austen Anthologies, Book 3 in 2019.
Her life in (usually) sunny, small town South Carolina is busy, but affords time for writing, reading, teaching and performing music, and playing games on her phone. (Would you believe she’s an elder in a war game? And she’s writing a book about it?)

More from Robin
I grew up in South Carolina during the 1960’s and 1970’s when the Civil Rights Act of 1964 became law. South Carolina did not comply immediately, so I remember my doctor’s office with two waiting rooms, two water fountains, and two doors, both leading to the same doctor and same examination room. It seemed very strange to me even then. I did not know any African American children, because schools, restaurants, churches, the town pool, the public health center, our neighborhoods – everything – was segregated.
When I was in high school, that began to change. At first, only a few African-American students came to my school. I really didn’t notice, because we all worked together. I have since looked back and realized the bravery of those students. They left their newly built high school, which was much nicer than the very old one I attended, and came to a place where they knew almost no one.
My junior year, our schools and all public buildings were desegregated. Our town handled it very well. Three high schools combined, but everyone kept doing the things they had done. That year, three sets of cheerleaders combined and three of each sports team came together. It was wonderful! We had cheerleaders all the way down the sidelines, and the captain’s position was shared. The school busses were desegregated as well, and I drove a route.
I have no bad memories of that time. There were no fights, no arguments, no violence of any sort.
This story is set in the mid 1840’s in South Carolina, and it addresses what sorts of things had to happen before we could get to The Civil Rights act and desegregation.

For a complete list of blog stops, go here!

Giveaway!
To celebrate her tour, Robin is giving away the grand prize of a $50 Amazon gift card!!
Be sure to comment on the blog stops for nine extra entries into the giveaway! Click the link here to enter.

9 comments:

  1. I read a book about the Civil Rights era with my students each year. So many of them have never heard about segregation at all!

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  2. This sounds good! That's an interesting perspective to use, with someone from anti-slavery England going to a slave state.

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  3. Sounds like an intriguing read!

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  4. Thank you for taking the time to share your terrific book with us. I enjoyed reading about it.

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  5. Looking forward to reading this one!

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  6. This book sounds like an excellent read. Very pretty cover!

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  7. Really wonderful tour for this book.

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